There are a wide variety of signs and signals that your loved one might be experiencing memory loss. And unfortunately, many of these signs can go unnoticed for a while, or downplayed as common behaviors of aging. By educating yourself on what to look for, you can better prepare yourself and your loved one if the time comes to seek additional help.

Dementia Behaviors of Concern

When someone is first diagnosed with dementia, it can feel as though they are mostly still themselves. However, as dementia progresses, the symptoms become more obvious and can impact your loved one’s health and safety.

1. Confusion
One of the most common signs of dementia, during the early stages your loved one might experience a loss for words, forget names or even have trouble processing new information. If this happens, try connecting with your loved one on an emotional level that lets them know they are not alone.

2. Lashing out in anger
Verbal or physical anger is not uncommon during the onset of dementia. Frustration builds as information is not being processed and paranoia can come from missing information or forgetting details. Be sure to not take it personally and do your best to change the subject or shift the conversation to something more positive.

3. Leaving the house alone
This is particularly concerning for caregivers. Memory problems associated with dementia can make a loved one feel disoriented even if they are in familiar places. This sometimes causes them to wander outside of the home. This might be a time to consider finding a full-time memory care community or new ways to keep your loved one engaged.

4. Loss of appetite
Another common symptom of dementia or Alzheimer’s is appetite loss. It’s not uncommon for memory loss to cause confusion during mealtimes. Try to help provide your loved one with healthy meal options that are easily accessible. Eat meals together, and keep an eye on your loved one’s weight.

5. Loss of sleep
“Sundowning” is a term often associated with Alzheimer’s disease. During the early evening your loved one can become restless, agitated and especially confused. This can interrupt sleep patterns and cause added stress. Try to schedule more challenging activities and tasks during the day instead of this early evening period.

Again, it’s important to know that this list is not all encompassing in terms of the types of behaviors your loved one with memory loss might experience. It does, however, give you a good place to start in helping your loved one with daily tasks and in dealing with this disease.

Transitioning to Full Time Memory Care

No matter what stage of life your loved one is in, Peregrine Senior Living offers something that no other memory care community can – we offer our residents the opportunity to search for purpose, validation and fulfillment, despite what was lost. That’s the Peregrine Way®, and you will only find it here at our memory care community.